The Best Economics Books

Whether you have no formal knowledge of economics, or you took a couple of economics courses in college, or you’re a current economics major, you might be looking for interesting and well-written books to help you gain a deeper understanding of this complex and influential discipline.We’ve compiled a list of some of the best economics books out…
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Externalities

Externalities are a form of market failure. Externalities are defined as the spillover effects of the consumption or production of a good that is not reflected in the price of the good. For example, the production of steel results in pollution being released into the air, but the cost of the pollution to the environment is not reflected in the…
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Budget Constraint

When consumers’ income limits their consumption behaviors, this is known as a budget constraint. In other words, it’s all of the many combinations of goods/services that consumers are able to purchase in light of their particular income as well as the current prices of these particular goods/services.In the short term, budget constraints can be…
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The Multiplier Effect

The Multiplier Effect is defined as the change in income to the permanent change in the flow of expenditure that caused it. In other words, the multiplier effect refers to the increase in final income arising from any new injections.Injections are additions to the economy through government spending, money from exports, and investments made by…
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Monopolistic Competition

In Monopolistic Competition, there are many small firms who all have minimal shares of the market. Firms have many competitors, but each one sells a slightly different product. Firms are neither price takers (perfect competition) nor price makers (monopolies).Example of Monopolistic Competition The athletic shoe market:When you walk into…
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Money Multiplier

The money multiplier describes how an initial deposit leads to a greater final increase in the total money supply. Also known as “monetary multiplier,” it represents the largest degree to which the money supply is influenced by changes in the quantity of deposits. It identifies the ratio of decrease and/or increase in the money supply in relation…
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